If you’re a bicyclist, you know that in a match-up of rider vs. car, the car always wins.

However, in the Newfoundland game of anything vs. moose, the moose almost always wins. These things are (sorry, Mr. Trump) HUGE! At the shoulder they are 6-7 feet high. Add the neck, head, and antlers, and well, it’s just big. Their antlers alone can span up to 6 feet across. Weight-wise, they are probably just a steak dinner lighter than a small Hyundai at 1,500 lbs. average.

Now why, I’m sure you’re asking, is this important? It’s like this – moose, like the younger of our own species, like to come out and play at night. They don’t have very good eyesight. And they’re a little on the obstinate side and can be mean-spirited. One more thing, they seem to like standing in the middle of the road just where you intended to aim your car. Oh, and to compound matters, they’re also dark-colored. So if you’re traveling on the Trans Canadian Highway at night and your forward progress is impeded suddenly, it’s entirely likely you ran into a moose. Usually at great damage and cost to your car. The road signs depicting and warning of such mayhem abound across the island and that in itself is a good case for rental cars and insurance while in Newfoundland.

Again, why is this important? Because as I started to head back to St. John’s from the Western Coast, I’d be traveling partly at night and am not particularly eager to make the intimate acquaintance of said creatures. I’m sure they’re lovely and interesting to study and good to their parents, but I’d try and skip that peculiar pleasure this trip. There are many more pictures to take for the book and this wasn’t in my plans.

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